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 LIMITATIONS OF A NIGERIAN FEMALE CHILD

Being black might have been seen as a limitation, but when born into certain places you would realize that being black, is just the starting point of your problems. it comes as constant worry, that most female children are seen as rape victims, and other forms of disrespect , even if the country is developing some areas like their mind-set seem to be lagging behind.

The female psychology have been so greatly manipulated that they see themselves as mere  “kitchen tools”, or “baby breeding machines”. Well, you cannot blame them as they have gone through many things that have destroyed their self-respect, making them go for the scrap. Those who have been considered as money milking machines might actually even seem great since you are considered as something worth money. In most eastern part of the country, the female child is not seen as a child at all, the family only fully celebrates when the male child is finally born, because to the male figure head – a heir of the family has arrived and there is no need for worry. The females are only there to get married so that their parents can collect their bride price.

Most female children, highly applied in the northern part of Nigeria, are betrothed to men – men old enough to be their grandfather – whilst still young, without allowing the child to grow, fall in love or give a consensus to whatever relationship she is into; therefore she would be forced to grow and fall in love with some stranger. This has been going on the country for centuries and most times it seems that nobody cares, leading the children to become withdrawn, accepting whatever fate lies ahead of them.

Going to school would have been a good improvement if the world itself did not see the female sex as incapable of pursuing some select dreams. The world seems to favour the male irrespective. So what is the problem here? Our problem is that the norms and culture that seem to guide us, have subdued one sex and upheld the other. Yes, we know that this norms and culture made us what we are today, but truthfully, what are we today?… but a country on a verge of failing, because seemingly only the rich are heard and the poor are not; this is the same as the case of females, who are not put into consideration because to them they are the “weaker vessel”.  It should not be seen as news that even in the family, when there is a male child, his thoughts are supreme.

We are quite happy now that as the world is developing, most women have been allowed to work and not be full house wives as opposed to before. It is characteristically true that when girls are growing up, most girls were taught to cook and that their main job is to have a family and be a good wife – Only few families thought their daughters that there was more to life than that. That is why, when they go out, they most times are left there in the wild – clueless.

Someone might say these are just blatant excuses , but the truth remains, the female sex is being oppressed and limited, and nothing seems to be effectively working to curb it.

Thank You.

Ude Ucha Kalu,
College of Medicine,
University of Lagos,
Nigeria.

 

 

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MIGRATION CRISIS: THE REFUGEE HEALTH

For the purpose of getting our terminologies right, lets understand that “all refugees are migrants but not all migrants are refugees”. They’ve been persecuted in their homeland, fleeing the crisis, and now, seeking asylum. A refugee isn’t your typical immigrant. Over the years, the world has had to deal with issues of migration which led to the formation of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), a programme mandated by the United Nations (UN) to protect and support refugees while assisting in their integration, resettlement or voluntary return to country of origin. However in 2015, crisis began all over the European continent as immigration numbers skyrocketed from unauthorized foreign migrants. These foreign migrants encompassed not only the vulnerable mass seeking refuge, but also some hostile agents.

The world has experienced the highest number of forcibly displaced people since World War 2-about 59.5million-and by 2015,over a million entered the European region and about 3700 died/went missing during the journey. The point is; this is a global crisis and concerted efforts should be made globally, not just by the European Union. Addressing the migration crisis, the Vice President of Nigeria, Professor Yemi Osinbajo stressed the need for care and respect for the migrants as most of them were forced to leave their ancestral homes. He also advised the International Organization of Migration (IOM) to ensure the proper documentation of all migrants.

Analyses from the World Health Organization (WHO) reviews the health status and access of a refugee from their country of origin, to their transit country and finally in their destination country.

In Syria alone, over 7 million people are internally displaced with the unrest causing shortages of qualified medical personnel and other medical aid and support. Interventions made by the WHO and partners include provision of supplies for treatment of critical conditions like diabetes and heart disease; vaccination against diseases like measles, rubella and polio; prevention of vector borne diseases like malaria; delivery of integrated primary health care, including mental health services; deployment of surgical teams and supplies; support for mobile clinics and outreach services for reproductive, maternal and newborn child health; and strengthened disease surveillance and outbreak response. All these are considered very important for integration in their destination countries as well as it helps to prevent the spread of communicable diseases amongst the refugees during transit.

Refugees in transit are usually vulnerable because their finances are usually limited. Therefore, special care and assistance should be rendered at this level. In countries like Turkey, Lebanon and Greece hosting the refugees, the

 

WHO works with the governments to improve access to basic healthcare needs by setting up clinics especially for the refugees; providing medical supplies, equipment and fuel; training for frontline health workers; collecting and analysing health data to shape decision-making and providing Ministries of Health and other partners with technical guidance on key public health issues.

Finally, even with the unprecedented influx of refugees in the European region, the WHO supports the receiving countries by performing joint assessments with Ministries of Health to assess health-system capacity to manage large influxes of refugees and migrants; giving policy advice on contingency planning for the health sector; providing emergency medicines and supplies; providing maternal and child health care services; providing mental health and psychosocial care; training for health workers; technical and financial assistance for outbreak response and immunization campaigns; dissemination of health information and educational materials to refugees and health workers; and cross-border collaboration for improved data collection and analysis.

It is in fact now widely understood that being and staying healthy is not only part of migrants’ human rights, but also a fundamental precondition for them to work, be productive and contribute to the social and economic development of their communities, both of origin and destination. Therefore, coordinated efforts are needed to ensure that migrant health is addressed throughout the migration cycle, as are efforts to adapt and strengthen the resilience of local health systems in light of more diverse population health profiles. Addressing the health of migrants and affected local populations reduces long-term health and social costs, is good public health practice, facilitates integration and contributes to social and economic development. The healthier migrants are and remain the more efficient and balanced the future of our highly mobile and globalized society will be.

 

ALUKO OLUWABUSAYO DANIEL
2ND YEAR, MEDICINE AND SURGERY
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF LAGOS, NIGERIA.
oluwabusayoaluko@gmail.com
+2348179380972

 

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